A comparison of irish and african american immigrants

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A comparison of irish and african american immigrants

Arrival of emigrants, Ellis Island The Irish immigrants left a rural lifestyle in a nation lacking modern industry. Many immigrants found themselves unprepared for the industrialized, urban centers in the United States.

Though these immigrants were not the poorest people in Ireland the poorest were unable to raise the required sum for steerage passage on a ship to Americaby American standards, they were destitute.

They often had no money beyond the fare for their passage, and, thus, settled in the ports of their debarkation. In time, the sum total of Irish-Americans exceeded the entire population of Ireland.

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The Irish established patterns that newcomers to the United States continue to follow today. Housing choices, occupations entered, financial support to families remaining in the homeland, and chain immigrations which brought additional relatives to America, are some of these patterns.

A comparison of irish and african american immigrants

Cellars, attics and make-do spaces in alleys became home. Not only were many immigrants unable to afford better housing, but the mud huts in which many had lived in Ireland had lowered their expectations.

Irish-Americans, Racism and the Pursuit of Whiteness -

A lack of adequate sewage and running water in these places made cleanliness next to impossible. Disease of all kinds including cholera, typhus, tuberculosis, and mental illness resulted from these miserable living conditions.

Thus, when the Irish families moved into neighborhoods, other families often moved out fearing the real or imagined dangers of disease, fire hazards, unsanitary conditions and the social problems of violence, alcoholism and crime.

How might the living conditions of the Irish have influenced their acceptance in the United States? How do living patterns of new immigrant groups affect their acceptance in the United States today? Who determines these patterns or conditions?In , Millard Fillmore was the American Party candidate for President and trumpeted anti-immigrant themes.

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Nativism caused much splintering in the political landscape, and the Republicans, with no platform or policies about it, benefited and rode to victory in the divisive election of The most Irish American towns in the United States are Scituate, Massachusetts, with % of its residents being of Irish descent; Milton, Massachusetts, with % of its 26, being of Irish descent; and Braintree, Massachusetts with % of its 34, being of Irish descent.

Throughout the Famine years, nearly a million Irish arrived in the United States.

Suggested Citation:"7 Sociocultural Dimensions of Immigrant Integration."National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The Integration of Immigrants into American pfmlures.comgton, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: / In , Millard Fillmore was the American Party candidate for President and trumpeted anti-immigrant themes. Nativism caused much splintering in the political landscape, and the Republicans, with no platform or policies about it, benefited and rode to victory in the divisive election of The blood in Irish veins is Celtic, right? Well, not exactly. Although the history that used to be taught at school said the Irish were a Celtic people who had migrated from central Europe, the latest studies of Irish DNA tell us a very different story.

Famine immigrants were the first big wave of poor refugees ever to arrive in . During much of the nineteenth century, when large numbers of Irish and Blacks were present, they were pushed into competition.

There are striking parallels in the culture and history of the two groups. They began their life in . Far from the Shamrock Shore is an ambitious, expertly executed treatment of the mostly forgotten tradition of Irish-American song. The accents here are as much American as Irish, and so are the musical settings, which owe more to 19th-Century string bands than to Celtic flute-and-pipe orchestras.

The Irish coming to the United States "had to leave the country, just as Africans had to leave -- African-Americans had to leave Africa and come over on a boat and try to make in the New World.

How African-Americans and African Immigrants Differ - The Globalist